Last edited by Vishicage
Wednesday, May 20, 2020 | History

1 edition of Zenobia of Palmyra found in the catalog.

Zenobia of Palmyra

Rex Winsbury

Zenobia of Palmyra

history, myth and the neo-classical imagination

by Rex Winsbury

  • 206 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Duckworth in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Kings and rulers,
  • Queens,
  • Biography,
  • History

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementRex Winsbury
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsDS99.P17 W56 2010
    The Physical Object
    Pagination198 p. :
    Number of Pages198
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24923362M
    ISBN 10071563853X
    ISBN 109780715638538
    LC Control Number2011431401
    OCLC/WorldCa505420807

    In Empress Zenobia, Pat Southern seeks to tell the other side of the legendary 3rd century queen's place in history. As queen of Palmyra (present-day Syria), Zenobia was acknowledged in her lifetime as beautiful and clever, gathering round her at the Palmyrene court writers and /5(22). Palmyra and Its Empire: Zenobia's Revolt Against Rome. Agnes Carr Vaughan. Zenobia of Palmyra. Rex Winsbury. Zenobia of Palmyra: History, Myth, and the Neo-Classical Imagination. William Wright. An Account of Palmyra and Zenobia: With Travels and Adventures in Bashan and the Desert. , reprint Yasamin Zahran.

      The pitch I was sent for The Queen of Palmyra by Minrose Gwin compared the book to The Help by Kathryn Stockett. Of course, I accepted. However, I would like to put this out there, I think that the comparison hinders The Queen of Palmyra. The only thing the two novels share is /5. Zenobia, regina de’ Palmireni (‘Zenobia, Queen of the Palmyrans’) is an opera in three acts by Tomaso Albinoni with a libretto by Antonio Marchi. It was Albinoni’s first opera, written when he was o and was first performed at the carnival at the Teatro Santi Giovanni e Paolo in work was popular and performances continued for several weeks.

    This article points to the many parallels between the book of Judith and the Arabic account of the life and death of Zenobia of Palmyra. By comparing these two stories with the episode about Zopyros in Herodotus’ Histories and the episode about Sinon in accounts of the fall of Troy, it argues that these similarities can only be explained if we assume that the book of Judith and the Arabic Author: Johan Weststeijn. Zenobia, queen of Palmyra: a tale of the Roman empire in the days of the Emperor Aurelian by William Ware (Book) Zenobia, queen of Palmyra: a narrative, founded on history by Adelaide O'Keeffe ().


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Zenobia of Palmyra by Rex Winsbury Download PDF EPUB FB2

Zenobia is encrusted with legends, ancient and modern. both the romantic image of her as a beautiful, intellectual but chaste Arab queen of the desert, and the political perception of her as a regal woman whose feminine qualities lifted her above her misfortune and her captor, do less than justice to Palmyra's most controversial : $ Verified Purchase.

The Empress Zenobia is the most famous Zenobia of Palmyra book of antiquity after Cleopatra. She was the queen of Palmyra who attempted to become Empress of Rome as the Empire seemed poised to fall apart.

This is probably Pat Southern's greatest by: 1. Its the story of Zenobia (Queen of Palmyra)and her husband King Odainat and their kingdoms struggles against the enemies of Rome (their ally at the beginning of the book).

Entwined with this is the story of Aurelian, a cunning Roman officer who wants one day to rise to Emperor and who curries favour with whomever has influence enough to help him achieve that goal/5(6).

Hailing from the Syrian city of Palmyra, a woman named Zenobia (also Bathzabbai) governed territory in the eastern Roman empire from to She thus became the most famous Palmyrene who ever lived.

But sources for her life and career are scarce. This book situates Zenobia in the social, economic, cultural, and material context of her Palmyra.5/5(3). Zenobia of Palmyra Hardcover – January 1, by Agnes Carr Vaughan (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editionsAuthor: Agnes Carr Vaughan.

About Zenobia of Palmyra. Queen Zenobia of Palmyra in Syria was one of the great women of classical antiquity, a romantic if tragic heroine both to Roman authors and to Chaucer, Gibbon and the neo-classical painters and sculptors of the nineteenth century.

in her desperate search for a survival strategy for her wealthy city in the chaotic third century AD Zenobia fell foul of Aurelian, one of. Zenobia of Palmyra book.

Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers.3/5(2). So, this book is about a queen you've more than likely never heard of, Zenobia, who ruled over Palmyra, in Syria, and her unfortunate fall at the hands of Aurelian, emperor of Rome.

The narrative is told solely through letters written by Lucius Piso, a 3/5. OCLC Number: Description: xiv, pages plates 25 cm: Contents: Book One: Zenobia and Odenath: Tadmor in the wilderness ; The fertile crescent ; Palmyra, bride of the desert ; The Caravan Gods of Palmyra ; Odenath, king of kings ; The city of the dead --Book Two: Zenobia, the Queen: Zenobia on her way ; Rose-red Petra ; Antioch the Golden ; Zenobia's protégé Paul ; Pursuit ; Kill.

Queen Zenobia of Palmyra in Syria was one of the great women of classical antiquity, a romantic if tragic heroine both to Roman authors and to Chaucer, Gibbon and the neo-classical artists of the 19th century.

But both the romantic image of her as a beautiful, intellectual but chaste Arab queen of the desert, and the political perception of her as a regal woman whose feminine qualities lifted. Zenobia accommodated Christians and Jews, and ancient sources made many claims about the queen's beliefs; Manichaean sources alleged that Zenobia was one of their own; a manuscript dated to mentions that the Queen of Palmyra supported the Manichaeans in establishing a community in Abidar, which was under the rule of a king named Amarō, who could be the Lakhmid king Amr ibn : Septimia Btzby (Bat-Zabbai), c.Palmyra, Syria.

Hailing from the Syrian city of Palmyra, a woman named Zenobia (also Bathzabbai) governed territory in the eastern Roman empire from to She thus became the most famous Palmyrene who ever lived. But sources for her life and career are scarce. This book situates Zenobia in the social, economic, cultural, and material context of her Palmyra.

Zenobia of Palmyra and the Book of Judith: Common Motifs in Greek, Jewish, and Arabic Historiography* JOHAN WESTSTEIJN Gerard Doustraat iii, XD Amsterdam, The Netherlands Abstract This article points to the many parallels between the book of Judith and the Arabic account of the life and death of Zenobia of : Johan Weststeijn.

Review of Zenobia of Palmyra by Rex Winsbury This is a book for all Zenobia fans. Even before you open it, you know it will be something special. The cover places Harriet Hosmer's larger-than-life size statue of Zenobia In Chains () right in front of the triple gate of Palmyra's Grand Colonnade, a leap of imagination across the centuries to unite two feminist icons: Hosmer's most.

Zenobia, queen of the Roman colony of Palmyra, in present-day Syria, from or to She conquered several of Rome’s eastern provinces before she was subjugated by the emperor Aurelian (ruled –). Zenobia’s husband, Odaenathus, Rome’s client ruler of Palmyra. This article points to the many parallels between the book of Judith and the Arabic account of the life and death of Zenobia of Palmyra.

By comparing these two stories with the episode about Zopyros in Herodotus’ Histories and the episode about Sinon. Book/Printed Material Zenobia; or, The fall of Palmyra. In letters of L. Manlius Piso [pseud.] from Palmyra, to his friend Marcus Curtius at Rome.

Zenobia, Queen of Palmyra: A Tale of the Roman Empire in the Days of the Emperor Aurelian by WARE, WILLIAM and a great selection of related books. To Zenobia’s court came artists and poets from Europe and the East. Rarely in history have the arts flourished as they did in Palmyra, during the reign of Zenobia.

(CC BY © Eric Paradis) Palmyra’s architects liked to adorn all the city’s public buildings with columns. Around the Central Temple courtyard they raised columns. Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg.

Prague, SANA_ The Czech writer Jiri Tomek recently published a new book about the life of Queen Zenobia of Palmyra. The page book, titled "Zenobia, the Queen of the Syrian Desert", gives.Hailing from the Syrian city of Palmyra, a woman named Zenobia (also Bathzabbai) governed territory in the eastern Roman empire from to She thus became the most famous Palmyrene who ever lived.

This book situates Zenobia in the social, economic, cultural, and material context of her Palmyra. Zenobia was born around AD in Palmyra, at that time a Roman province. As she was given the name Julia Aurelia Zenobia, it can be said that she was a Roman citizen.

Roman citizenship was granted to her father’s family at an earlier date, perhaps during the reign of Marcus Aurelius in the latter part of the 2 nd century : Dhwty.